What to Expect When You’re Expecting Joint Replacement Surgery

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The wait is up – and you’re ready to leave the debilitating joint pain you’ve been managing for years behind you. It’s the day of your joint replacement procedure.

The thought of surgery may seem stressful, but as a patient of the Connecticut Orthopaedic Institute at MidState Medical Center, you are confident. Before arriving at the hospital for your procedure, you have already met your doctor and your nurse navigator. You’ve learned all about what to expect through an in-person and online educational series. And you know that once you arrive, you and your loved ones are in a facility that was designed by doctors to specifically manage the unique needs of orthopaedic patients.

“The education we provide our patients prepares them for an exceptional experience before and after surgery,” says Dr. John McCallum, medical director of the Connecticut Orthopaedic Institute, who specializes in knee replacements. “My colleagues and I came together to create an environment that is geared solely to the orthopaedic patient.”

The Institute’s physician leaders considered every detail. First, they handpicked the highly skilled anesthesia and surgical professionals. The team created a program centered around the optimal time to start rehabilitation. The Institute is staffed by nurses who achieved advanced certification in orthopaedic care.  Significant attention was given to the planning of amenities for patients and visitors. The Institute’s surgeons are renowned professionals in their fields. And the educational classes are a key component in patients achieving the best outcome in the shortest period of time.

Every patient receives a comprehensive guidebook full of information and tools to prepare for their surgery. The book includes details for patients and loved ones about how to prepare your body for surgery; how to prepare your home for your post-surgery arrival; and what to do the night before and the morning of your surgery. The book even includes descriptions of your care team; plus arriving at the institute; overnight accommodations for visitors; valet parking; amenities; and more.

By the time patients arrive for their surgery, they have a clear understanding of what the day will look like:

  • Patients are welcomed by free valet services just outside the Connecticut Orthopaedic Institute entrance.
  • Check in is conveniently located at the registration desk located immediately inside the entrance. A staff member will register you and guide you to the preoperative area, where you will change into a hospital gown and have a short physical exam.
  • Then the surgical team will be introduced to you, and anesthesia will discuss their Your surgical site will also be identified and marked prior to your surgery.
  • A staff member will direct your support person to the waiting area where they have access to comfortable seating, desks with Wi-Fi, and several food and coffee options.
  • When your surgery is complete, a staff member will notify your support person and arrange for them to meet with your surgeon in a private location adjacent to the waiting area.
  • Once you leave the post-anesthesia care unit, your recovery and rehabilitation starts right away in your private inpatient room.

“We have worked hard to create a seamless, exceptional experience to ensure the best possible outcomes for every patient,” says Dr. McCallum. “We are exceeding regional and national benchmarks in both safety and satisfaction with our orthopaedic programs that support the patient from every aspect.”

For more information about the Connecticut Orthopaedic Institute at MidState Medical Center, visit ctorthoinstitute.org. To find a doctor, call 833.CT.ORTHO (1.833.286.7846). 

 

 


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