What to Expect When You’re Expecting Joint Replacement Surgery

Print icon

The wait is up – and you’re ready to leave the debilitating joint pain you’ve been managing for years behind you. It’s the day of your joint replacement procedure.

The thought of surgery may seem stressful, but as a patient of the Connecticut Orthopaedic Institute at MidState Medical Center, you are confident. Before arriving at the hospital for your procedure, you have already met your doctor and your nurse navigator. You’ve learned all about what to expect through an in-person and online educational series. And you know that once you arrive, you and your loved ones are in a facility that was designed by doctors to specifically manage the unique needs of orthopaedic patients.

“The education we provide our patients prepares them for an exceptional experience before and after surgery,” says Dr. John McCallum, medical director of the Connecticut Orthopaedic Institute, who specializes in knee replacements. “My colleagues and I came together to create an environment that is geared solely to the orthopaedic patient.”

The Institute’s physician leaders considered every detail. First, they handpicked the highly skilled anesthesia and surgical professionals. The team created a program centered around the optimal time to start rehabilitation. The Institute is staffed by nurses who achieved advanced certification in orthopaedic care.  Significant attention was given to the planning of amenities for patients and visitors. The Institute’s surgeons are renowned professionals in their fields. And the educational classes are a key component in patients achieving the best outcome in the shortest period of time.

Every patient receives a comprehensive guidebook full of information and tools to prepare for their surgery. The book includes details for patients and loved ones about how to prepare your body for surgery; how to prepare your home for your post-surgery arrival; and what to do the night before and the morning of your surgery. The book even includes descriptions of your care team; plus arriving at the institute; overnight accommodations for visitors; valet parking; amenities; and more.

By the time patients arrive for their surgery, they have a clear understanding of what the day will look like:

  • Patients are welcomed by free valet services just outside the Connecticut Orthopaedic Institute entrance.
  • Check in is conveniently located at the registration desk located immediately inside the entrance. A staff member will register you and guide you to the preoperative area, where you will change into a hospital gown and have a short physical exam.
  • Then the surgical team will be introduced to you, and anesthesia will discuss their Your surgical site will also be identified and marked prior to your surgery.
  • A staff member will direct your support person to the waiting area where they have access to comfortable seating, desks with Wi-Fi, and several food and coffee options.
  • When your surgery is complete, a staff member will notify your support person and arrange for them to meet with your surgeon in a private location adjacent to the waiting area.
  • Once you leave the post-anesthesia care unit, your recovery and rehabilitation starts right away in your private inpatient room.

“We have worked hard to create a seamless, exceptional experience to ensure the best possible outcomes for every patient,” says Dr. McCallum. “We are exceeding regional and national benchmarks in both safety and satisfaction with our orthopaedic programs that support the patient from every aspect.”

For more information about the Connecticut Orthopaedic Institute at MidState Medical Center, visit ctorthoinstitute.org. To find a doctor, call 833.CT.ORTHO (1.833.286.7846). 

 

 


What's New

Romberg Exercise

What is Romberg Exercise?

Balance exercises can reduce the risk of a fall for people with vertigo. Improved balance can also encourage people with vertigo, and its sensation of spinning, to increase physical activity and enhance their social life. The Romberg exercise is both an easy and an effective way to reduce symptoms of...

Truncal Lymphedema

When Breast Cancer Treatments Cause Truncal Lymphedema

Lymphedema, a collection of fluid that can cause swelling, is possible anywhere in the body but seems to be identified and addressed more commonly when it happens in an arm or leg. When persistent swelling occurs in the underarm, breast, or chest, patients will often decide to wait and see...

Cancer Recovery and Physical Activiity

The Importance of Physical Activity in Cancer Survivorship

By Gretchin Bade Program Director of Oncology Hartford Hospital Rehabilitation Network At least 20 studies of people with breast, colorectal, prostate and ovarian cancer have suggested that physically active cancer survivors have a lower risk of cancer recurrence and improved survival compared to survivors who are inactive. Exercise also has...


How Vestibular Rehab Can Help Those Struggling with Dizziness, Balance Problems and Motion Intolerance

Vestibular rehabilitation is a complex discipline. Hartford HealthCare Rehabilitation Network has a team of highly skilled vestibular therapists located throughout the state to meet the needs of patients experiencing various disorders including vertigo (true spinning sensation), dizziness (feeling off), balance problems, nausea and motion intolerance.  According to the National Institutes...


How Physical Therapy Can Help Your Low Back Pain

Low back pain, a common problem, is a major cause of disability resulting in difficulties with function at home and work. More than 80 percent of Americans experience low back pain at some point in their lives. Jonathan Sylvain, manager of the Hartford HealthCare Rehabilitation Network’s Spine Program, says physical...