How to Stop Prostate Cancer? It Starts With a PSA Test

PSA test
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Dr. Ryan Dorin, a urologist at the Hartford HealthCare Tallwood Urology & Kidney Institute, says the PSA test remains the best way to detect prostate cancer at its earliest stages and give the patient the best chance at successful treatment.

Here’s a quick Q&A:

Q: There has been a fair amount of conflicting information regarding prostate cancer screening using a blood test, known as PSA or prostate specific antigen, what is currently being recommended?
A: Well, that’s a great question and, you’re right, there has been somewhat conflicting information publicized over the last few years. And part of the reason is due to the fact that a few large medical studies have come to different conclusions on the benefit of PSA testing. The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force recently completed their latest review of this topic and upgraded their recommendation from a D to a C rating for PSA testing. Meaning that an informed patient based on a conversation with their physician should consider PSA testing, especially between the ages of 55 and 70.

Q.  What are some of the treatments the Hartford HealthCare Tallwood Urology & Kidney Institute offers for men with prostate cancer?
A: The treatment options for prostate cancer vary widely depending upon what stage the disease is in at the time of diagnosis — which gets back to PSA testing and screening with the hope of diagnosing the disease sooner when more treatment options are available and likely to be successful. As far as treatment: Active surveillance, surgery and radiation are all options for localized disease. Hormone deprivation therapy and chemotherapy are best for more advanced forms.

Q.  ZERO, a national not-for-profit organization with the mission of eliminating prostate cancer, asked the Hartford Healthcare Tallwood Urology & Kidney Institute to be its host for the only race in Connecticut. Can you tell us about the race?
A. We are proud to partner with ZERO to end prostate cancer. The 2018 ZERO Prostate Cancer Run/Walk — Hartford features a 5K run/walk, Kids’ Superhero Dash for Dad, and a health fair located on the concourse. Stick around for the family-friendly post-race celebration. Participants will receive shirts, free food, and the opportunity to connect with others who are impacted by prostate cancer. Last year, we raised over $100,000 for prostate cancer research and educational programs.

It’s just a great way to come out and support friends, family, and all those who have been touched in some way by prostate cancer!

Want to learn more about prostate health? Click here to register for free information session with Dr. Ryan Dorin Sept. 26  at the Wheeler Regional YMCA (Rudy/Community Room), 145 Farmington Ave.

 

 


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