Trinity Men’s Hockey, in Fundraiser Game, Sees Pink in the Rink

Pink in the Rink
Print icon

Unless women are playing, there’s not usually too much pink showing on the ice during a hockey game.

But, on a recent Friday, the Trinity College men’s hockey team draped the Koeppel Community Sports Center in Hartford with the color for Pink in the Rink, a fundraising game that has generated more than $40,000 for the Hartford Hospital Mobile Mammography Fund.

“A few of you have lived what families and patients go through who experience cancer, and you decided to make a difference for others. Not only have you made a difference but you got others to join the cause and make stuff happen,” said Kristi Gafford, senior vice president of the Hartford HealthCare Cancer Institute, who was on hand for the game. “I want to thank and celebrate the Trinity College men’s hockey team for making a difference in the lives of this community.”

Trinity beat Middlebury College 6-2 in the Feb. 7 game before a packed arena. The evening included a raffle, as well as T-shirts, hats and bracelets for sale. All proceeds from the night were donated by the team to the Mobile Mammography Fund, which helps brings mammograms into the communities around Hartford to increase the availability and convenience for women. Early diagnosis is the best way to fight breast cancer.

The event underscores the almost year-old partnership between Hartford HealthCare and Trinity through which the system provides healthcare services to students on the college campus.

GoFundMe Donations to the Trinity hockey fundraiser can be made for a limited time here.


What's New

Parkinson's Research

Research: Inhibiting Gene in Test Mice Can Quiet Parkinson’s Tremors

When University of California-San Diego (UCSD) scientists transformed brain cells into functioning neurons that restored dopamine, eliminating Parkinson’s disease motor symptoms in test mice, humans watched with anticipation. The research, “Reversing a model of Parkinson’s disease with in situ converted nigral neurons,” was published this summer in the journal Nature....

COVID Panic

How to Make it Through The Toughest Days of COVID-19

By Amanda Brill Licensed Clinical Social Worker Hartford HealthCare Chase Family Movement Disorders Center It’s entirely reasonable during a pandemic to feel more stressed, anxious, lonely and depressed than usual. Yet, despite the circumstances, some people seemed to be doing OK. Researchers wanted to know what they were or were...