The Link Between Erectile Dysfunction and Heart Disease

Print icon

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men in the United States and worldwide. For the man who regularly consults with his doctor, however, heart disease and its potentially fatal consequences are usually avoidable. Dr. Waseem Chaudhry is a preventive cardiologist at the Hartford HealthCare Tallwood Men’s Health Center.

Q: Why do men experience having a heart attack earlier than women do?

A: Heart attack is so much more common in men than women. It also presents 7 to 10 years earlier, and 1 in every 4 men die of a heart attack every year in the U.S.

Q: Can you explain the relationship between erectile dysfunction and the risk for heart disease? 

A: The same process that goes on in the vasculature in erectile dysfunction is also involved in vascular health in the coronary arteries as well. So if the lining of the blood vessels is affected and you have problem there, you can have the same problem in the coronary blood vessels as well. Blockages form in the erectile dysfunction mechanism as well. Same thing happens in the coronary artery disease. Usually when erectile dysfunction kicks in, it takes about 4 to 5 years. It’s just a matter of time before the heart attack presents itself.

Q: As a preventive cardiologist, how do you help men identify these risk factors?

A: At Tallwood Men’s Health, we have a preventative program where we use personalized cardiac risk assessment and evaluation from traditional risk factors like hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol and also the blood markers. We also get objective data from coronary artery calcium scoring. These factors help us to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease.

Click here for more information on Tallwood Men’s Health in Farmington. 

 


What's New

Mobile Testing

With 38,000 Tests, Mobile COVID-19 Program Reaches State’s Underserved

Hartford HealthCare (HHC) this week reached a milestone of 37,864 COVID-19 tests completed. Thousands were through its mobile testing program, designed to help reach underserved population across Connecticut, according to Dr. Ajay Kumar, chief clinical officer for the system. Because testing is critical to managing the spread of the virus and...

Cookout

10 Tips to Keep Your Summer Entertaining Safe During COVID-19

The summer season is officially underway and whether you spent the holiday weekend at home – again! – or widening your world in some way, chances are you’ll be trying to socialize sometime soon. COVID-19 social distancing guidelines have kept us largely at home. As infection rates decline, many are...

Walk on the Beach

Is it Safe to Take a Summer Vacation, Even Fly?

Distancing, both physical and social, is the buzzword of the year and one Hartford HealthCare (HHC) experts want you to remember as the state reopens and you begin venturing out of your home this summer. The warmer months, when kids are traditionally of school, are a time when many people...

COVID and Pets

CDC’s COVID-19 Update Spares Pets, Downgrades Threat of Infected Surfaces

COVID-19 spreads more person-to-person than surface-to-person or animal-to-person, according to the latest update guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The person-to-person spread surprises no one, but the CDC has downgraded the risk of  touching a contaminated surface, then infecting yourself by touching your nose, eyes or mouth....