Mulberry Gardens Offering Free Memory Screenings in Southington

Memory screening
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For many people, forgetting things becomes more common as they age. When forgetfulness starts interfering with daily life, it could be a sign of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. A memory screening can be the first step in learning that simple forgetfulness might actually indicate a more serious problem.

Mulberry Gardens of Southington is offering free, confidential memory screenings on Thursday, Nov. 7, from 10 am to 1 pm at 58 Mulberry St. These confidential memory screenings, which average 10 minutes, consist of questions and tasks to assess memory. They do not diagnose any illness, but can indicate whether someone should follow up with a full medical exam by their physician.

“Memory screenings are very important in that early detection can help physicians more effectively treat cognitive impairment and possibly slow down memory changes,” said Jennifer Doty, director of social services and resident service coordinator at Mulberry Gardens, who is conducting the screenings..

To make an appointment for a memory screening on Nov. 7 or on another date at Mulberry Gardens of Southington, call 860.276.1020. Mulberry Gardens also offers in-home memory screenings by appointment.

Mulberry Gardens of Southington is a not for profit assisted living, adult day and memory care community and a member of Hartford HealthCare Senior Services, a Hartford HealthCare Partner. For more information about Mulberry Gardens, click here or call 860.276.1020.

 


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