Movement Disorders Care Comes to Mystic

Dr. Elena Bortan
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Much as the design of the new Hartford HealthCare facility at 100 Perkins Farms Drive in Mystic reflects the vibe of coastal community, the location of specialists from the HHC Ayer Neuroscience Institute’s Chase Family Movement Disorders Center to the facility answers a demand for high-quality care and support in the area.

“(We) listen to the community as we would an individual patient,” said Dr. Elena Bortan, above, a movement disorders specialist who will see patients in Mystic with her colleague Dr. Marisa Moro-de-Casillas. “We are coming closer to our patients and their families in this new, state-of-the-art medical facility.”

The building reflects the image of a lighthouse on the exterior and, inside, has a nautical feel with a variation of blues. It is light and welcoming and incorporates elements of each end of Coogan Boulevard, both Mystic Aquarium and Mystic Seaport.

The Chase Family Movement Disorders Center is in Suite 102, where Dr. Marisa Moro-de-Casillas and Dr. Elena Bortan are joined by a full complement of staff including advanced practitioners, a neuropsychologist, social worker, nurses, medical assistants, patient service coordinators and practice manager.

“I am very excited to be part of an amazing interdisciplinary team to care for patients with Parkinson’s disease and movement disorders,” Dr. Moro-de-Casillas said.

The HHC Rehabilitation Network is also located in the building to provide speech, physical, and occupational therapies. Integrative medicine practitioners offer acupuncture and massages, and free classes in general exercise, Tai Chi and yoga take place in the Community Wellness and Education Room.

To connect with the Chase Family Movement Disorder Center, call 860.870.6385 or click here.


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