Dr. Mohamad Khaled, a Neurosurgeon, Joins Ayer Institute

Ayer Institute Adds Neurosurgeon
Print icon

Hartford HealthCare’s Ayer Neuroscience Institute announced the appointment of Dr. Mohamad Khaled as a neurosurgeon seeing patients both at Hartford Hospital and in offices in Enfield.

“Dr. Khaled’s broad base of expertise enhances the services we already provide to patients suffering from various diseases and tumors of the brain and spine,” said Dr. Mark Alberts, physician-in-chief of Ayer Neuroscience Institute, “His highly specialized surgical skills help us offer people world-class options for brain and spine conditions without having to travel far.”

Dr. Khaled comes to Hartford HealthCare from Baystate Health, where he was director of functional neurosurgery and launched the Deep Brain Stimulation Program, the first of its kind in western Massachusetts. He was also an assistant professor of surgery at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center-Baystate.

His areas of clinical interest include deep brain stimulation; epilepsy surgery; cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine surgery, including minimally-invasive spine surgery, cervical spine deformity correction surgery and spine tumors; surgery for pain; and brain tumors. His research has included work on MR-guided ultrasound lesioning in deep brain stimulation and comparing radiofrequency, GammaKnife radiosurgery and focused ultrasound lesions in the brain.

Dr. Khaled, who is fluent in English and Arabic, earned his medical degree from Ain Shams University in Cairo, Egypt, and completed a residency at Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center. He also completed fellowships in epilepsy surgery and pediatric neurosurgery at Cleveland Clinic. He is a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

Dr. Mohamad Khaled, a member of the Hartford HealthCare Medical Group, is accepting patients by referral in office at 85 Seymour St., Suite 1003, Hartford, or 100 Hazard Ave., first floor, Enfield. For an appointment, call 860.696.2290.


What's New

Cookout

10 Tips to Keep Your Summer Cookout Safe During COVID-19

The summer season is officially underway and whether you spent the holiday weekend at home – again! – or widening your world in some way, chances are you’ll be trying to socialize sometime soon. COVID-19 social distancing guidelines have kept us largely at home. As infection rates decline, many are...

Walk on the Beach

Is it Safe to Take a Summer Vacation, Even Fly?

Distancing, both physical and social, is the buzzword of the year and one Hartford HealthCare (HHC) experts want you to remember as the state reopens and you begin venturing out of your home this summer. The warmer months, when kids are traditionally of school, are a time when many people...

COVID and Pets

CDC’s COVID-19 Update Spares Pets, Downgrades Threat of Infected Surfaces

COVID-19 spreads more person-to-person than surface-to-person or animal-to-person, according to the latest update guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The person-to-person spread surprises no one, but the CDC has downgraded the risk of  touching a contaminated surface, then infecting yourself by touching your nose, eyes or mouth....


Windham paramedic program honors 25 years

Since its inception 25 years ago, the paramedic program at Windham Hospital has saved countless lives, built partnerships with 16 fire departments and served the 400-square-mile community around the hospital. In 1995, the town of Windham recognized the need for paramedic or advanced life support services in the Windham and...

Public Restroom

Is it Safe to Use a Public Bathroom During COVID-19?

As the country reopens, state by state, is there public trust in public restrooms? Put it this way: At last check, New York’s subway system had one bathroom per 53,000 riders. In Connecticut, public restrooms remain closed at most state parks. Elsewhere, will people change their hygiene habits when in...

COVID-19 Blood

Where to Get a COVID-19 Antibody Test, And Why

During the COVID-19 surge in Connecticut, diagnostic tests  performed with a nasal swab were critical in determining who had been infected with the coronavirus. Now, as the state’s economy reopens, a blood test is helping health professionals detect an immune response in people who were infected and also identify people were...