Dr. Virginia Bieluch

Infectious Diseases

Dr. Virginia Bieluch is Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Hospital of Central Connecticut and Associat ...More e Professor of Medicine at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.Dr. Bieluch graduated from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine. She did her residency in Internal Medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital and a fellowship in Infectious Diseases at Tufts New England Medical Center.Prior to coming to the Hospital of Central Connecticut Dr. Bieluch was on the faculty at the Medical College of Ohio.In addition to serving as the Chief of Infectious Diseases at HOCC, Dr. Bieluch has served on numerous committees at HOCC, HHC and the UCONN school of Medicine. Currently she is Co-leader of the HHC System Antimicrobial Stewardship Council, Chairperson of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee at HOCC, HOCC Site Director for the ID fellowship, and Chairperson of the UCONN ID fellowship Clinical Competency Committee. She leads the antimicrobial stewardship efforts at HOCC.Dr. Bieluch has been involved in teaching medical students, residents and ID fellows. She has been recognized for her teaching ability by both the Primary Care Internal Medicine Residents and Infectious Diseases Fellows at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine....Less

Recent Articles

Flu Season

I’m Sneezy, Achy and Tired: Is It the Flu?

The New Year is here, and while so many people have high hopes of good health for 2020, others are already suffering from the flu and other illnesses. We are in the midst of a very active flu season. More than 6 million people in the United States have already...

Rabies

When Rabies Can Kill: Watch for These Signals

When most people think of rabies, they think of the awful disease that turned a loving family dog like Old Yeller into a vicious animal like Cujo. But outside of Hollywood, how much do you actually know about rabies and how this disease has affected residents in their own backyard?...

Chopped romaine lettuce in a bowl.

Tainted Romaine: Why This E. Coli Makes You Sick

The E. coli traced to chopped lettuce that caused an outbreak last week in 11 states, including Connecticut, makes people ill because the bacteria produces a toxin known as Shiga. This E. coli, identified as E. coli 0157:H7 (or simply 0157), is the most common Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, or...


Seven More Flu Deaths in State Bring Total to 119 This Season

The state Department of Public Health is reporting seven more flu-related deaths, bringing the 2018 flu death total in Connecticut to 119. At least 98 of those deaths, 82 percent, are reported in people aged 65 or older. Seniors are a particularly vulnerable population, according to Dr. Virginia Bieluch from...


Flu ‘Widespread’ in State; Hartford County Hardest Hit

Never mind what you want for the holidays. We all know what you don’t want — the flu. But it’s too late for many of you. Connecticut is now among 12 states with flu activity classified as widespread. The state Department of Public Health says 355 people have tested positive...

Germs on white background.

Holiday Alert: The Germiest Places In Home, Office, Public Places

Happy holidays, everyone. May this season full of crowded office parties, overstuffed buffet tables and family gatherings remain joyous and germ-free. Germ-free? Yes, germs never take a holiday. Please don’t get sick. We won’t lecture on the importance of washing your hands — in the war against germs, it’s our...


Why Babesiosis Can Be More Serious Than Lyme Disease

Lyme disease isn’t the only serious tick-borne illness in Connecticut. The Aug. 8 death of a New Milford man from liver and kidney failure was the third fatality in the state in the past three years attributed to babesiosis, microscopic parasites transmitted by ticks that infect red blood cells. The number...


Is West Nile Virus At Threat, Even After Mosquitoes Test Positive In 12 Towns?

The mosquito, eclipsed by the tick as a summertime health threat in the state, attracted renewed interest this week after the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station announced mosquitoes in 12 towns tested positive for West Nile virus this season. The virus, detected in mosquitoes in Connecticut each summer since 1999, causes...


What Happened To Zika? Why The Virus Remains A Threat

Zika has somehow become the nobody-cares virus, with a recent Gallup poll indicating close to 90 percent of Americans believe it’s unlikely they will become infected. They’re probably right, assuming they don’t travel to one of the 62 countries The World Health Organization has designated  as areas with active Zika...


Revenge Of The Stomach Bug: How To Avoid Norovirus

It’s the talk of schools, offices and homes along the Eastern seaboard: The dreaded “stomach bug” and norovirus, the primary cause of illness and outbreaks from contaminated food in the United States. Norovirus that causes diarrhea and vomiting is sometimes accompanied by a fever and body aches. The virus spreads quickly...


West Nile Virus: Usually Benign, But A Threat To People Over 50

The West Nile virus, a threat in Connecticut each summer since 1999, has been found in eight towns, most recently in East Haven and Newington. A human infected with the virus often experiences generic symptoms such as body aches, fever and vomiting. “In most cases,” Dr. Virginia Bieluch, an infectious...


Video: Mumps Makes A Comeback. Is Vaccine Effective?

After a recent outbreak on college campuses, there are questions about the spread of mumps. Hartford HealthCare’s Dr. Virginia Bieluch, chief of Infectious Diseases at The Hospital of Central Connecticut, has some answers.