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Chopped romaine lettuce in a bowl.

Tainted Romaine: Why This E. Coli Makes You Sick

The E. coli traced to chopped lettuce that caused an outbreak last week in 11 states, including Connecticut, makes people ill because the bacteria produces a toxin known as Shiga. This E. coli, identified as E. coli 0157:H7 (or simply 0157), is the most common Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, or...

Woman at indoor rock-climbing facility.

How to Stop the Brain Drain of Aging

As aging takes its toll on our bodies and brain mechanics, researchers point to lifestyle, exercise habits and eating patterns that can maximize brain health and minimize impairment. Lynne McPhee, a registered dietitian at Backus Hospital, says what we eat and how we live can impact our brain’s ability to...

Mac and cheese.

The Best (And Worst) Mood-Altering Food

Can what we eat affect more than our waistline? Many times, during our visit to a doctor’s office, we’re told how to eat to keep us physically healthy. For example, a DASH (Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension) diet may help lower blood pressure while a low-glycemic diet can help with...


A Guide to Life After Cancer

The Hospital of Central Connecticut (HOCC) is offering a free educational series, “Cancer Transitions, A Guide to Your Life After Cancer,” for cancer survivors. Starting May 10, this educational series will educate patients who have recently completed treatment or who are undergoing hormone therapy on what they can expect in...


Proactive professionals prepare for ‘13 Reasons’ sequel

The controversial Netflix show “13 Reasons Why” promoted conversations between teens and parents around difficult topics like suicide and bullying, but also sparked a firestorm of criticism over its graphic content and concern about copycat suicides.  “Anecdotally, Hartford Hospital, Connecticut Children’s Medical Center and other  emergency departments saw a notable...

Doctor reviewing CT scan.

Are You at Risk for Stroke?

Strokes don’t just happen to older people. In 2009, the latest figures a available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 34 percent of people hospitalized for stroke were less than 65 years old. You are at risk for stroke if you have: High blood pressure. High cholesterol. Diabetes....