Hartford HealthCare Increases Minimum Hourly Rate to $15

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More than 2,400 employees to benefit from increase, effective March 31

Hartford HealthCare today (Monday, 1/14) announced it will increase its minimum hourly rate to $15, effective March 31, 2019.

The new pay rate will directly benefit more than 2,400 of Hartford HealthCare’s approximately 20,000 employees throughout Connecticut. These employees provide important services across the organization and directly touch the lives of patients and customers.

“This important decision is a reflection of our respect for our staff and a product of our core value of integrity that calls us to ‘do the right thing,’ ” said Elliot Joseph, Chief Executive Officer of Hartford HealthCare. “Investing in the financial security of those who work with us is further recognition of everyone’s contributions to carrying out our mission.”

Joseph noted the benefits of a higher minimum hourly rate extend well beyond paychecks. “We know, and studies have shown, there is a direct link between greater financial security and better health outcomes,” he said. “A healthier Hartford HealthCare workforce benefits all of us.”

Hartford Healthcare expects the additional investment in its staff will increase employee retention, help attract great applicants for open positions, improve employee satisfaction, and create a greater sense of belonging in the organization.

The decision came after months of thoughtful consideration and planning.

“Working alongside all of you as part of the Hartford HealthCare team fills me with great pride,” Joseph wrote to employees. “I hope that all staff members share my pride in being part of an organization that always strives to live its values.”

For more information about careers at Hartford HealthCare, visit https://hartfordhealthcare.org/health-professionals/for-job-seekers.


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