Watch Your Step: It’s Stars Dancing for Parkinson’s May 10

Dancing with the Stars
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They’re doctors, administrators, corporate organizers – and now they’re dancers as part of the second annual Stars Dancing for Parkinson’s fundraiser to benefit the Chase Family Movement Disorders Center at the Hartford HealthCare Ayer Neuroscience Institute.

“I’m no dancer – I’m not even sure I have rhythm!,” said Donna Handley, president of Backus and Windham hospitals and one of the “celebrity” dancers competing. “But, when I thought about the great things the Ayer Neuroscience Institute is doing for (our) patients, I simply couldn’t say no.”

Planned for Friday, May 10, from 6-11:30 p.m., at the Hartford Marriott Downtown, Stars Dancing for Parkinson’s features eight dancers who have been training for several months with their experienced dance partners to compete for the top prize, as decided by four celebrity judges.

In addition to Handley, dancers include:

  • Andrew Carroll, service line director of oncology for the Hartford HealthCare Medical Group (HHCMG).
  • Michael Daglio, senior vice president and chief transition officer, Fairfield Region, Hartford HealthCare.
  • Andrea Dash, director of planning and communications at Hartford HealthCare.
  • Ray Figlewski, patient advocate.
  • Therese Hannoush McCarthy, a member of the community.
  • Dr. Camelia Lawrence, a breast surgeon at the Hospital of Central Connecticut.
  • Michael Nappi, vice president, Community Network-Independence at Home.

Their dancing will be judged by:

  • Joanne Berger Sweeney, a Hartford HealthCare board member and president of Trinity College where she is a professor of neuroscience.
  • Jeffrey Flaks, president and chief operating officer of Hartford HealthCare.
  • Jocelyn Maminta, WTNH-Channel 8 personality.
  • Jonathan Roberts, U.S. and World Professional American Smooth champion, U.S. Rising Star ballroom champion.

Parkinson’s disease is the second most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder in the world, affecting seven to 10 million people. The Chase Family Movement Disorders Center combines the most advanced diagnostic and therapeutic skills to provide compassionate and comprehensive care in the management of the disease and other movement disorders.

This includes cutting-edge research, pharmacologic management, surgical options, and psychosocial support. Our Community Wellness and Education Room serves as a venue for educational programs and exercise classes in dance, tai chi, boxing and interval training.

Tickets to the Stars Dancing for Parkinson’s fundraiser are $150 a person and are available by clicking here.

 


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