Where to Dispose of Unwanted Prescription Drugs? Here’s a Drop-Box Map.

Medicine Bottles and Pills
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The state Department of Consumer Protection has launched a tool to help community members locate the nearest prescription drug drop box in the state.

The DCP website now contains an interactive map (click here) where people can zoom into their town and see the closest place to safely dispose of their unneeded medication.

“We’re working to improve the resources we have to promote safe drug disposal every day,” said Consumer Protection Commissioner Michelle H. Seagull. “We know that every little bit counts, and every unneeded medication safely disposed of could be saving a life.”

In 2016, families in Connecticut disposed of over 33,000 pounds of unneeded medication, and the program currently has 84 drop boxes located at local and state police stations.

Natchaug Pharmacy Director Jose Scarpa says the new web page is an excellent resource.  He’s says his pharmacy student was easily able to navigate and provide a list of drop off area addresses in Eastern Connecticut for staff and the community.

“It’s important for community members to properly dispose of their old medications,” says Scarpa. “For people who do not discard medications they no longer use, particularly  the elderly, they could end up taking the wrong medication or dose or an expired medication that is ineffective. Additionally, there might be medications left around that have the potential for abuse. There are also ecological consequences for flushing medications down the toilet or throwing them in the garbage.”

For more information on services available at Natchaug Hospital, click here.

 


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