Increased Access to Specialty Services, Growth on the Shoreline and Plainfield and Enhanced Coordination of Care Highlight Backus and Windham Hospital Annual Meeting

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Backus Hospital and Windham Hospital experienced a year of growth, increased access to specialty services in the community and enhanced care coordination in 2018, according to Hartford HealthCare East Region President Donna Handley at the combined Annual Meeting of the two hospitals on Nov. 7.

The meeting, the theme of which was “Trusted, Coordinated Care,” was held in the Betty Tipton Room in the Student Center at Eastern Connecticut State University.

“I’m happy to announce tonight that 2018 was a very successful year for both Backus and Windham Hospitals.  And we are, better than ever, prepared for the growth we will see in 2019,” said East Region President Donna Handley.

Handley pointed to orthopedic surgery, the addition of specialty services, and growth on the shoreline and Plainfield as contributors the region’s success.

“None of this would be possible without our strong foundation and infrastructure,” said Handley.  “Being able to accommodate this growth and sustainability is a true testament to the talent and dedication of our staff and to our leadership team who continue to ensure we have the staffing and resources necessary to achieve our goals.”

Highlights of the year at the two hospitals included:

  • Expansion of Hartford HealthCare services on the shoreline including the addition providers in the areas oncology, general surgery and primary care.
  • Constitution Surgery Center East, a joint venture between Hartford HealthCare and Constitution Surgery Alliance, opened its new ambulatory surgery center on Cross Road in Waterford in November.
  • Continued expansion of services in Plainfield with the opening a new Hartford HealthCare Cancer Institute Infusion Center and a Chase Family Movement Disorder Center at the Hartford HealthCare Health Center at 584 Norwich Road.
  • The addition of specialty physicians including cardiology, oncology, general surgery, neurology, and geriatrics.
  • Windham joined Backus becoming only the second hospital in eastern Connecticut to utilize the Globus ExcelsiusGPS ® surgical robot to perform spine surgery.  The technology results in greater precision and faster recovery time.
  • Windham Hospital officially opened its 3,800-square-foot Lester E. & Phyllis M. Foster Oncology and Infusion Center in the Windham Hospital Family Health Center. Located adjacent to the main hospital building on the second floor of 5 Founders St., the new facility opened to patients in February.
  • The Jeffrey P. Ossen Family Foundation awarded a $47,407 grant to the Windham Hospital Foundation for the purchase of a new paramedic intercept vehicle for the hospital. This is the latest generous donation from the Ossen Foundation.
  • Backus Hospital earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Heart-Check mark for Advanced Certification for Primary Stroke Centers, both of which represent symbols of quality.
  • The Backus Hospital Breast Cancer Program earned a three-year reaccreditation from the American College of Surgeons’ National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers.
  • Backus celebrated its 125 anniversary with celebrations including a staff appreciation day at Dodd Stadium, a medical staff picnic, recognition events with gifts for staff to celebrate Founder’s Week in October and a history wall in the Medical Office Building corridor.

View the 2018 Backus and Windham Annual report here


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