Drs. Nowicki, London, Frallicciardi to Lead Tweeting for CME’s on Emergency Medicine on Nov. 29

Print icon

You’re a busy professional in the demanding field of healthcare. One of the demands is finding the time to take Continuing Medical Education (CME) hours to keep abreast of the latest innovations in healthcare, not to mention maintain your licensure.

Hartford HealthCare’s Department of Continuing Education can help with the new “Tweeting for CME’s” program.

Yes, you can participate in a Twitter chat led by a healthcare professional – just like yourself – and earn CME credits for taking part in a substantive manner.

“Each one-hour chat discusses a de-identified patient case and/or peer-reviewed journal article,” said Hillary Landry, professional education manager with Hartford HealthCare’s Office of Experience, Engagement & Organizational Development. “Participants wishing to earn CMEs would review the case or article in advance, then attend and participate in the chat by providing their insights using a specific Twitter hashtag: #CMEHHC.”

All are welcome to join us for the next “Tweeting for CME’s” on-line journal discussion on emergency medicine. It will be led by Thomas Nowicki, MD, FACEP, Hartford HealthCare Director of Medical Education, and Medical Director for the Hartford HealthCare Center for Education, Simulation and Innovation (CESI); partnering with University of Connecticut Emergency Medicine Residency Program Director, Dr. Shawn London and the lead author of the featured article, Dr Alise Frallicciardi, the Director of Simulation for the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

The article for discussion is entitled “Training for Failure: A Simulation Program for Emergency Medicine Residents to Improve Communication Skills in Service Recovery,” from AEM Education and Training, a global journal for emergency care, and presented at the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, Indiana in May 2018. It may be found free-of-charge here.Please review this article for discussion prior to the chat.

CMEs will be available at the conclusion of the chat via a chat-specific link provided on Twitter, based on participant application and review of the chat record to confirm participation.

“We’re excited to be on the cutting edge, providing clinicians with CME opportunities that are valuable and convenient,” Landry said.

The next Tweeting for CME’s chat takes place on Thursday, November 29, 2018, at 12 noon (ET). It will be led by Thomas Nowicki, MD, FACEP, Hartford HealthCare Director of Medical Education, and Medical Director for the Hartford HealthCare Center for Education, Simulation and Innovation (CESI); partnering with University of Connecticut Emergency Medicine Residency Program Director, Dr. Shawn London and the lead author of the featured article, Dr Alise Frallicciardi, the Director of Simulation for the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

Interested providers will need to have (or set-up for free) an account with HHC’s CME portal, available here. Upon completion, search for the CME event with the keyword “Twitter” to claim your credit. 

 


What's New

Vasectomy Clinic

A March Madness Shocker: It’s the Tallwood Vasectomy Clinic!

FARMINGTON – While you’re laid up on the couch recovering from your vasectomy, you may as well have something fun to watch, right? That seems to be the thought behind a craze dubbed “Vas Madness” in which doctors and healthcare systems see an increase in the number of vasectomy procedures...

Non-Proprietary Medicine pill Bottles

How to Dispose of Prescription Meds, Properly, Without Leaving the House

Here’s a great way to warm up for spring-cleaning season. Retrieve all unused prescription drugs from medicine cabinets, bathroom drawers and your keep-it-away-from-the-kids hiding spot in the kitchen. Wait! Don’t just drop them in the household trashcan. And avoid the convenience of the nearest toilet. The Food and Drug Administration...


Newington WWII Veteran Awarded French Knight of the Legion of Honor

More than seven decades after he served in World War II, John Faenza of Newington has received the highest possible military honor an American can receive from the French people. With his wife, children, friends and former co-workers by his side, the 93-year-old Cedar Mountain Commons resident was awarded an honorary...


Tallwood Men’s Health: Heart Health

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men in the United States and worldwide. For the man who regularly consults with his doctor, however, heart disease and its potentially fatal consequences are usually avoidable. Dr. Waseem Chaudhry is a preventive cardiologist at the Hartford HealthCare Tallwood Men’s Health Center....


Tallwood Men’s Health: A Guy’s Medical Man Cave

The statistics say it all: Men are nearly one-and-a-half times as likely as women to die from almost every chronic medical condition. On average, men live five years less than women, according to the National Center for Health Statistics. But a new program at Hartford HealthCare has been designed to...