Drs. Nowicki, London, Frallicciardi to Lead Tweeting for CME’s on Emergency Medicine on Nov. 29

Print icon

You’re a busy professional in the demanding field of healthcare. One of the demands is finding the time to take Continuing Medical Education (CME) hours to keep abreast of the latest innovations in healthcare, not to mention maintain your licensure.

Hartford HealthCare’s Department of Continuing Education can help with the new “Tweeting for CME’s” program.

Yes, you can participate in a Twitter chat led by a healthcare professional – just like yourself – and earn CME credits for taking part in a substantive manner.

“Each one-hour chat discusses a de-identified patient case and/or peer-reviewed journal article,” said Hillary Landry, professional education manager with Hartford HealthCare’s Office of Experience, Engagement & Organizational Development. “Participants wishing to earn CMEs would review the case or article in advance, then attend and participate in the chat by providing their insights using a specific Twitter hashtag: #CMEHHC.”

All are welcome to join us for the next “Tweeting for CME’s” on-line journal discussion on emergency medicine. It will be led by Thomas Nowicki, MD, FACEP, Hartford HealthCare Director of Medical Education, and Medical Director for the Hartford HealthCare Center for Education, Simulation and Innovation (CESI); partnering with University of Connecticut Emergency Medicine Residency Program Director, Dr. Shawn London and the lead author of the featured article, Dr Alise Frallicciardi, the Director of Simulation for the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

The article for discussion is entitled “Training for Failure: A Simulation Program for Emergency Medicine Residents to Improve Communication Skills in Service Recovery,” from AEM Education and Training, a global journal for emergency care, and presented at the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Annual Meeting, Indianapolis, Indiana in May 2018. It may be found free-of-charge here.Please review this article for discussion prior to the chat.

CMEs will be available at the conclusion of the chat via a chat-specific link provided on Twitter, based on participant application and review of the chat record to confirm participation.

“We’re excited to be on the cutting edge, providing clinicians with CME opportunities that are valuable and convenient,” Landry said.

The next Tweeting for CME’s chat takes place on Thursday, November 29, 2018, at 12 noon (ET). It will be led by Thomas Nowicki, MD, FACEP, Hartford HealthCare Director of Medical Education, and Medical Director for the Hartford HealthCare Center for Education, Simulation and Innovation (CESI); partnering with University of Connecticut Emergency Medicine Residency Program Director, Dr. Shawn London and the lead author of the featured article, Dr Alise Frallicciardi, the Director of Simulation for the University of Connecticut School of Medicine.

Interested providers will need to have (or set-up for free) an account with HHC’s CME portal, available here. Upon completion, search for the CME event with the keyword “Twitter” to claim your credit. 

 


What's New

Ride to Wellness

Parkinson’s and the Benefits of Biking (Ride to Wellness is Sept. 21!)

Editor’s note: On Saturday, Sept. 21, Hartford HealthCare is sponsoring Ride to Wellness, a free bike ride with 10- and 25-mile routes through scenic Cheshire. The ride starts and ends at the new state-of-the-art Hartford HealthCare HealthCenter at 280 South Main Street in Cheshire. For more information, click here. By Dr. Duarte...

Vascular System

Why Put Vascular Disease on Your Radar? Ask This Vascular Surgeon

Most people never have to worry about vascular disease. But everyone should know about it because vascular disease can affect up to 25 percent of people as they age. What happens when we age? A number of changes can take place within our arteries and veins. Some people develop blockages,...

Vaping Bearded Man

Vaping and Your Kid’s Health: A Guide for Parents

Marketed as a healthier alternative to cigarettes, vaping is now being linked to a stream of bizarre lung illnesses causing shortness of breath, chest pain and vomiting. The Associated Press reported as many as 50 people across six states, mostly teens or young adults, have been diagnosed with breathing illnesses...


Why Parkinson’s Researchers Now Targeting the Gut, Appendix

It might seem odd that one of the first symptoms of Parkinson’s disease is constipation, but those familiar with the workings of the human gut understand that it holds the key to many bodily functions. Dr. Duarte Machado, a Parkinson’s disease specialist and co-director of the Hartford HealthCare Ayer Neuroscience...

Stress Test

How to Prepare for a Stress Test

An exercise electrocardiogram, better known as a stress test, will give your Heart & Vascular Institute doctor important information about how you heart responds when pushed to its limit during physical exertion. The test is performed as you exercise on a treadmill while hooked up to an electrocardiogram, or EKG, machine....