Three Steps To Avoid The Flu This Season

Yes, it's possible to avoid getting the flu.

Print icon

“Take 3 Actions” offers three simple steps to stop the spread of the flu:

1. Take the time to get a flu vaccine.

It’s the most effect way to prevent the flu during season that peaks in February and March but can start as early as October and last through May.

The influenza vaccine protects against the strains of the flu that research predicts will be most common during the year. It is especially important that individuals who are at high-risk to suffer complications from the disease get immunized.

High-risk individuals include:

  • Young children. Since children 6 months and younger cannot be vaccinated, their caregivers should be vaccinated to decrease risk to infant.
  • Pregnant women.
  • Those over 65 years of age.
  • Those with chronic health conditions including asthma, diabetes, and heart and lung disease.

2. Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.

Stop the spread of germs with these simple tips:

  •  If you do get the flu, limit your contact with other people.
  •  Always cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. Throw the tissue away after one use.
  • Wash your hands with warm water and soap, often.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, mouth and nose — germs spread this way.
  • Disinfect surfaces that may be contaminated with germs.

3. Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.

If you experience the following symptoms during the flu season, contact your health care provider:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Some people also experience vomiting and diarrhea
  • Body aches
  • Headache
  • Chills
  • Fatigue

For more information, please visit HartfordHealthCare.org.


What's New

Cancer cells.

Dr. Wylie Hosmer: Weaponizing Your Immune System Against Cancer

By Dr. Wylie D. Hosmer The three most terrifying words in the English language may be: “You have cancer.” But exciting advances in research have uncovered more powerful treatment options, using the patient’s immune system, to target and attack cancer cells. More research is needed, but this treatment known as...


Child Car Seat Safety: Installation is Key

Did you know that accidents – including car accidents – are the leading cause of children’s deaths? Child safety seats can reduce death by as much as 71 percent and prevent injury but only if they are used correctly, according to Safe Kids Connecticut. Connecticut law requires that all children...

Woman taking out trash.

Is Taking Out The Trash Any Way To Live Longer? (Really?)

Thanks to fitness-tracker accelerometers, researchers have learned more precisely the amount of physical activity it takes to live a longer, fitter life. Surprisingly, not much. Three studies that used accelerometers to measure participants’ activity  concluded in recent months that even the lightest regular physical activity — making a bed, taking...

IV bags.

How Hurricane Maria Caused Nationwide IV Bag Shortage

With a nationwide shortage of intravenous bags, clinical pharmacies across Hartford Healthcare are working to ensure patient care isn’t interrupted. The Wall Street Journal reported that the shortage began in September after a group of IV bag manufacturing plants in Puerto Rico lost power because of Hurricane Maria. The shortage...

Man with flu.

The ‘Man Flu’: A Severe Case or Severe Wimpiness?

When it comes to complaining about flu and other upper-respiratory infection symptoms, men might not be wimps after all.  Maybe. A new study by researchers at Memorial University of Newfoundland in Canada found that “man flu” — a term often used by women who think that men complain more about...