Three Steps To Avoid The Flu This Season

Yes, it's possible to avoid getting the flu.

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“Take 3 Actions” offers three simple steps to stop the spread of the flu:

1. Take the time to get a flu vaccine.

It’s the most effect way to prevent the flu during season that peaks in February and March but can start as early as October and last through May.

The influenza vaccine protects against the strains of the flu that research predicts will be most common during the year. It is especially important that individuals who are at high-risk to suffer complications from the disease get immunized.

High-risk individuals include:

  • Young children. Since children 6 months and younger cannot be vaccinated, their caregivers should be vaccinated to decrease risk to infant.
  • Pregnant women.
  • Those over 65 years of age.
  • Those with chronic health conditions including asthma, diabetes, and heart and lung disease.

2. Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs.

Stop the spread of germs with these simple tips:

  •  If you do get the flu, limit your contact with other people.
  •  Always cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. Throw the tissue away after one use.
  • Wash your hands with warm water and soap, often.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, mouth and nose — germs spread this way.
  • Disinfect surfaces that may be contaminated with germs.

3. Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them.

If you experience the following symptoms during the flu season, contact your health care provider:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Some people also experience vomiting and diarrhea
  • Body aches
  • Headache
  • Chills
  • Fatigue

For more information, please visit HartfordHealthCare.org.


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