Omnipod: Animal, Vegetable or New Wireless Insulin Pump?

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For those with Type I diabetes, there is a new, wireless insulin pump that is lightweight, and allows patients to manage their daily insulin intake more freely without being attached to a bulky device. It’s called the Omnipod. 

Hartford HealthCare endocrinologist Dr. Michael LeMay has more information. 

Q.   Explain the difference between Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes.
A.  All people with diabetes either lack the ability to produce insulin, or have too little insulin or cannot use insulin effectively. For people with Type 1 diabetes – the body’s immune system destroys the cells that release insulin – eliminating insulin production from the body. Type 2 diabetes can develop at any age – and it is when the body produces insulin, but isn’t able to use it the right way.

More: How To Avoid Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Q.    How does the Omnipod work?
A.  The Omnipod is specifically for type 1 patients as well as  for type 2 patients who no longer can produce insulin on their own. Studies confirm that even a 30-minute interruption of basal insulin delivery results in significant glucose elevation. People who wear insulin pumps routinely disconnect to bathe, swim, play contact sports, etc. With Omnipod, there’s no need to disconnect- so blood sugars stay in a safe range.

Q.    How is this device different from other insulin pumps?
A.  The Omnipod offers everything a regular pump would offer – but it’s the continuous insulin delivery that makes this an even better option. Its two parts communicate wirelessly, which eliminates tubing, and the Omnipod’s automated insertion is virtually pain-free. The personal diabetes manager includes a fully integrated blood glucose meter, so there is nothing extra to carry, and no manual entry is required.

For more information about diabetes, click here.

 


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