Indoor Exercise Ideas to Keep You Active in the Colder Months

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As the temperature drops and the daylight hours begin to fade away, there’s no excuse to stop your exercise activities just because you can’t be outdoors anymore.  Those looking to keep up with their exercise routines during the winter months have plenty of options to stay in shape even as they stay indoors.  Ryan Rossi PTA at the Center for Musculoskeletal Health at the Bone & Joint Institute at Hartford Hospital, explains that there are numerous ways to stay active during the winter.

Whether you are planning to join a gym, enroll in a Pilates or spinning class or just want to stay in the comfort of your own home, the key, Rossi says, is to set a goal and stay committed to reaching it. That could mean anything from training for your first 5K, a charity bike ride, an endurance race, triathlon or even a full marathon, but having something to keep you focused on will keep you motivated and moving.

“Find a future event you’d like to participate in and sign up for it,” Rossi said.  “There so many different types of event out there these days, so find the one that’s right for you and stay committed to training for it.”

Another way to keep yourself focused on fitness when you can’t be outside is to download an exercise app that has easy to do, preprogrammed workout routines.  These are a great way to keep yourself motivated says Rossi and will help keep you in the mindset of “just do it.”

“Set your alarms to do these types of workouts two to three times a week,” he said “Make sure you pick a time when you are able to complete them all the way through and don’t wait longer than a few seconds to start them or your mind will begin to think of reasons why you shouldn’t.“

Another unique way to ensure you stick to an exercise routine is to enlist the help of a friend or family member.  Say you will pay that person a set amount of money for every day or week you don’t achieve your exercise goals.  The amount of money doesn’t matter, says Rossi, it’s the fact that you are being held accountable that will keep you motivated.

For more exercise tips from Rossi and the rest of the staff at the Center for Musculoskeletal Health at the Bone & Joint Institute, follow their Instagram page at @boneandjointinmotion  or click here


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