Hospital of Central Connecticut Adds Dr. Carrie Carsello, Endocrine Surgeon

HOCC adds endocrine surgeon.
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NEW BRITAIN – The Hospital of Central Connecticut (HOCC) has announced the addition of endocrine surgeon Dr. Carrie Carsello.  She is the only Hartford HealthCare surgeon who is fellowship trained in endocrine surgery, which treats conditions thyroid cancer, thyroid nodules, goiters, hyperparathyroidism, Graves’ disease and nodules, tumors, and cancer of the adrenal glands

“Dr. Carsello’s expertise will significantly expand the services we are able to provide to patients suffering from endocrine-related diseases,” said Gary Havican, president of The Hospital of Central Connecticut and MidState Medical Center. “Her highly specialized skills will enable local patients to get world-class care close to home.”

In addition to her fellowship training in endocrine surgery, Dr. Carsello is board certified in general surgery. She specializes in surgeries of the thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal and pituitary glands.

Dr. Carsello joins HOCC from Colorado, where she served on the staff at Rose Medical Center. A graduate of Colorado State University, she earned a medical degree from Chicago Medical School and completed an internship and residency in surgery at Albany Medical Center. She completed her fellowship in endocrine surgery at the Medical College of Wisconsin.

Dr. Carsello is an avid researcher who has presented lectures and posters, as well as authored articles in peer-reviewed journals on such topics as parathyroidectomy in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, laparascopic sigmoid resection for diverticulitis, thyroid cancer, and elevated parathyroid hormones after surgery.

She is a member of the American College of Surgeons, the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons, and the American Thyroid Association.

Dr. Carrie Carsello, who is a member of the Hartford HealthCare Cancer Institute, is accepting patients by referral in her office at 183 North Mountain Road, New Britain. For an appointment, call 860.827.6068.


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